Demonstrators hold signs during a rally outside Trump Tower in New York on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2016 to protest against President-elect Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Never Ending Protests

We are three weeks into President Trump’s first term, and I am already exhausted. The non-stop protests, anger, and nonsense can just wear you down. We’ve gone from a “Women’s March” that uninvited pro-life and evangelical women’s groups to a Women’s Strike to protesting over every little thing.

At the same time, the President eggs it all on. He attacks Nordstrom for canceling his daughter’s clothing line. The President campaigned against a Democratic Administration picking winners and losers, and now he is doing the same thing. He is taking the word “bully” from his bully pulpit a bit too literally.

Things seem vastly more chaotic now. The government is supposed to give some level of stability and instead it feels less stable now. Things are more uncertain. People are expected to pick sides. If you have criticized the President, any praise is a betrayal. If you were a Presidential supporter, any criticism is a betrayal. Grace is out the door.

The situation reminds me of Wisconsin. After Scott Walker won the gubernatorial race the first time, progressive activists in Wisconsin began their “years of struggle.” The Republicans outsiders found themselves in charge of all three branches of state government, and the left was angry.

Democrats walked out of the legislature in a vain effort to stop right to work legislation. Progressive activists tried to disrupt meetings. A local partisan district attorney used his subpoena power to raid the homes of prominent conservatives, threatening to cart them off to jail for helping Governor Walker.

For all the mass hysteria over Donald Trump, the truth is that we have been here before with the left in Wisconsin. It got ugly and escalated quickly. They tried to recall Gov. Walker and a supreme court justice. They hurled rocks and debris, threatened lives, disrupted government meetings, and at what cost? They had no real success.

The leftwing activists had inspired fellow leftwing activists to protest and disrupt, but the larger community of citizens turned against them. Americans are, like other people, a group of sinners, which means we are flawed. But one of our greatest assets is we believe in giving people, even those we do not like, a chance. In Wisconsin, polling of voters showed they had gotten deeply angry at the activists, not the Republicans.

Despite all the money poured into Wisconsin organizing and mobilizing leftwing activists, their recall effort failed. Then Scott Walker successfully won re-election in the state. The progressive activists tried the same sort of disruptive protests in Texas over abortion issues then saw their heroine, Wendy Davis, lose both women and Hispanics to Governor Greg Abbott. I wonder if that might happen nationally.

The left is emboldened by Hillary Clinton winning the popular vote. Exclude California, however, and she lost the popular vote. California has gone so far to the left that it tilted polling, tilted the popular vote, and tilted voters’ perceptions. But in blue collar states that were once reliably Democrat, voters turned against Democrats. Erie County, PA went for Ronald Reagan, then turned blue. It held for Barack Obama twice. Then it went for Trump. Its voters are, right now, seething with anger against leftwing activists for considering Erie voters racist for voting for Trump.

Four years of non-stop protest may very well exhaust us all, but I suspect voters will treat the protestors like a petulant child. They will refuse to give in. These protestors may be the President’s greatest asset for securing a second term.

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Erick Erickson

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