Czech-Mate: European Government Votes to Allow Citizens to Carry Guns

The continent of Europe is not a complete and utter lost cause. The Czech Republic–which has always been a gun-friendly country in spite of being subjugated to the European Union’s influence–just voted to allow its citizens to arm themselves against any threat of tyranny.

More specifically, the lower house of the Czech parliament voted 139 out of 200 votes in favor of the bill on Wednesday as a measure to combat terrorism. The bill is expected to pass in the upper chamber of their Parliament and be signed into law by the country’s president. However, it’ll likely be stopped by the European Commission–the European Union entity responsible for overseeing gun policies. This same commission adopted stricter gun control measures back in December. The Czech president recently said he wanted more of his citizens to be armed to combat greater terrorism threats. It’s unsure if this law, if passed and signed into law, will have standing in spite of the EU’s asinine firearms policies.

Here’s a sample of the bill’s draft:

“This constitutional bill is in reaction to the recent increase of security threats, especially the danger of violent acts such as isolated terrorist attacks … active attackers or other violent hybrid threats.”

Per Yahoo!, which first reported the story, there are over 800,000 firearms of all calibers and sizes registered in the Czech Republic.

Given the Czech Republic’s history–especially the illegal Soviet occupation that befell the country last century–the government is keen on not repeating past mistakes that would leave its populace defenseless against any threat of tyranny–especially terrorism. Thank goodness we have the Second Amendment here in the U.S. Let’s hope countries like Czech Republic can follow our lead and protect their citizens!

Britain Filed for Divorce From the E.U. Today

Great Britain has began the formal process to leave the European Union. This came after residents of the country voted for autonomy last June with a vote of  51.9-48.1 percent in favor of the “Leave” campaign. The election boasted a historic 77.2% turnout. Following “Leave” campaign’s success, Prime Minister David Cameron resigned and his fellow Conservative Party member Theresa May assumed the prime minister role.

Today, Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty –which has never been invoked before — will be used to begin Great Britain’s formal divorce from the E.U. This will initiate two years of lengthy negotiations with respect to autonomy and trade–with a formal British exit expected by March 2019. If no formal agreement is reached or agreed to by the remaining EU countries within two years’ time, then Great Britain will be under the duress of the World Trade Organization and have tariffs imposed on all goods the nation sells to the E.U.

Here are the provisions for Article 50 of the aforementioned treaty, which would theoretically penalize any member that decides to leave:

1. Any Member State may decide to withdraw from the Union in accordance with its own constitutional requirements.

2. A Member State which decides to withdraw shall notify the European Council of its intention. In the light of the guidelines provided by the European Council, the Union shall negotiate and conclude an agreement with that State, setting out the arrangements for its withdrawal, taking account of the framework for its future relationship with the Union. That agreement shall be negotiated in accordance with Article 218(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. It shall be concluded on behalf of the Union by the Council, acting by a qualified majority, after obtaining the consent of the European Parliament.

3. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend this period.

4. For the purposes of paragraphs 2 and 3, the member of the European Council or of the Council representing the withdrawing Member State shall not participate in the discussions of the European Council or Council or in decisions concerning it.

A qualified majority shall be defined in accordance with Article 238(3)(b) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

5. If a State which has withdrawn from the Union asks to rejoin, its request shall be subject to the procedure referred to in Article 49.

For context as to why the vote took place, I recommend watching “Brexit The Movie”:

Why Brexit? The Brits were tired of taking decrees from Brussels–the epicenter of the E.U. How can a continent-wide entity decide the fate or best represent all 27 countries? It clearly can’t. And we’ll see more countries attempt to defect and similarly regain autonomy.

Plus, for Americans, travel to Britain is expected to become cheaper — an expected 20 percent in savings.

What will other tangible benefits of Brexit be? We are expected to have better U.S.-U.K. trade relations and a renewed friendship that soured under the last administration.

For those asserting Brexit in any way, shape, or form is an endorsement of pro-Kremlin activists should be dismissed. Both the European Union and Putin’s attempt to create a Eurasian Union are terrible arrangements which fail to promote autonomous countries, free market ideals, and limited government. This dichotomy musth be rejected when thinking in terms of Brexit.

Overall, Americans should welcome Brexit. Countries desiring to be autonomous and more freedom-minded should be embraced in the 21st century. Cheers to our friends across the pond!

 

New Documentary on Brexit Vote Should Be Watched By Every American

All eyes are on Great Britain as the island nation votes on Thursday whether to leave or stay in the European Union.

The vote has garnered immense global attention. From flotilla wars on the Thames River to celebrity endorsements, those involved in the “Leave” and “Stay” campaigns have certainly drawn the rest of the world in.

For us American conservatives, it’s intriguing to see Britain desire autonomy once again in spite of the European Union–the Brussels-based statist governing entity that dictates continent-wide policy for 28 different countries.

Not sure how you feel about Brexit? Nate Madden of Conservative Review has an excellent write-up explaining the nuances of the Brexit vote. Our EIC Erick Erickson also wrote a nice ditty about the upcoming vote, which can be read here.

A new documentary “Brexit: The Movie” was released last month to explain the importance and significance of the Brexit vote being brought before voters on June 23rd. It makes a compelling case for the “Leave” campaign. The full-length documentary has been released on YouTube and is free to watch.

Below is the link:

Enjoy!

Brussels Has Further Restricted Gun Rights in the E.U.

The European Union (E.U.) recently took drastic measures to further restrict gun ownership throughout its 28 member states.

E.U. interior ministers decided on June 10th to tighten current gun control laws in place—a move viewed negatively by several member states. If ratified by the European Parliament, this proposal will include an EU-wide regime on deactivated firearms—a move slated to harm collectors and hunters. They argue this proposal will make it easier to track illegal guns and discourage people from purchasing semi-automatic firearms, citing their use in the two terror attacks. However, several member states have serious doubts about proposed rule changes.

The E.U. already forbids most fully automatic firearms, along with several popular semi-automatic firearms enjoyed by many here in the United States. How will imposing greater restrictions on semi-automatic firearms make Europe safer if current gun control laws in place have failed to deter terrorists in Paris and Brussels?

Not all E.U. member states plan to comply with this directive.

Members states like Czech Republic and Poland have taken issue with this directive. Finland and Switzerland have also expressed doubts in the proposed legislation. Unlike other member states comprising the E.U., these countries have more liberalized, pro-gun laws. Moreover, these countries have less overall crime in their respective societies thanks to the presence of pro-gun laws in spite of current E.U.-wide restrictions.

Here were proposed gun control measures the E.U. had deliberated earlier this year in wake of the Paris and Brussels terrorist attacks, according to CNN:

1. More categories of semi-automatic weapons will be subject to an outright ban. The new ban will apply to “B7” weapons, or “semi-automatic firearms for civilian use which resemble weapons with automatic mechanisms.” EU countries will still be able to issue licenses for some semi-automatic rifles for hunting, collecting and museums.

2. Deactivated weapons are currently treated as pieces of metal that can be traded freely across European borders. That will no longer be possible. “Under no circumstances will civilians be authorized to own any of the most dangerous firearms (e.g. a Kalashnikov), which is currently possible if they have been deactivated,” the proposal states.

3. Gun brokers and dealers will have to be licensed to deal in weapons. Collectors will have to get a license and face background checks even if they only own deactivated weapons. There will also be new limits on the ability to buy gun parts and ammunition online.

4. Tracing guns should become easier thanks to enhanced rules on how guns must be marked and registered. And blank firing weapons will be regulated for the first time because they can be converted to fire live ammunition.

Other E.U. member states have also expressed interest in extending firearms privileges and rights to members of the military—a move expected to be challenged by the E.U.

The Baltic Republic of Lithuania, which was the first country to declare its independence from the Soviet Union, is looking to allow its military volunteers to private own semi-automatic firearms at home. Both Lithuania’s parliament, Seimas, and military personnel have expressed their desire to allow military volunteers to privately own semi-automatic firearms—especially in wake of Russia trying to reassert itself in the Eastern Bloc.

Looking to the United States as an example, the European Union should permit greater gun rights—not fewer gun rights. Why should Brussels dictate gun rights for 28 vastly different countries? Individual member states should be able to allow gun rights in their respective countries based on need, not based on Brussels’ desires for disarmament.

As opposition to banning AR-15 semi-automatic rifles is mounting here in the U.S. following the Orlando terrorist attack, opposition to further gun control measures should equally be met in the European Union.  It’ll be interesting to see if Thursday’s Brexit vote will propel more E.U. member states to reconsider their membership–especially if the E.U. decides to further encroach on limited gun rights that remain in the region.

Former Soviet Republic Wants Military Volunteers to Privately Own Firearms

The Baltic Republic of Lithuania, which was the first country to declare independence from the Soviet Union, is considering a move to allow paramilitary volunteers to privately keep firearms at home. The Seimas–Lithuania’s parliament–wants members of the Lithuania Rifleman’s Union and National Defense Volunteer Forces to acquire and keep semi-automatic firearms at home.

A spokesperson for the Rifleman’s Union said this: “We could expand the deterrence potential. The potential enemy will be discouraged, because they would not know how many citizens are armed and able to resist. This will take off some burden from the state and strengthen national defence potential.”

This shouldn’t come as a surprise. In October 2014, more private citizens in the Baltic nation were purchasing firearms for self-defense in wake of threats from Putin’s Russia:

People in the country currently own over 100,000 various pistols, revolvers and different shotguns. Some of them are highly spectacular guns that can be used for more than just self-defence, sports or hunting, but also for a guerrilla war.

Here are the conditions for obtaining firearms in Lithuania, per the 2002 Law on Control of Weapons and Ammunition Act: 

1. Permanent residents of the Republic of Lithuania and legal persons registered in the Republic of Lithuania may acquire and keep weapons, ammunition for the following purposes:

1) hunting;
2) sports;
3) self-defence;
4) professional activities;
5) collection;
6) training;
7) scientific research;
8) other purposes, if they are in conformity with laws and international agreements and treaties.

2. Permanent residents of the Republic of Lithuania and legal persons registered in the Republic of Lithuania shall have the right to acquire ammunition for weapons which they are entitled to possess.

Since Lithuania, like other European Union member states, is at the behest of Brussels, this move to allow private ownership of firearms for military volunteers may get shot down. The E.U. currently boasts some of the world’s most restrictive, Draconian guns laws–making it virtually impossible for individuals to keep and bear arms without going through hurdles to legally obtain them.

The European Union had mulled over more gun control restrictions despite recent terrorist attacks that have befallen the region. Here were their recent proposed gun control amendments:

1. More categories of semi-automatic weapons will be subject to an outright ban. The new ban will apply to “B7” weapons, or “semi-automatic firearms for civilian use which resemble weapons with automatic mechanisms.” EU countries will still be able to issue licenses for some semi-automatic rifles for hunting, collecting and museums.

2. Deactivated weapons are currently treated as pieces of metal that can be traded freely across European borders. That will no longer be possible. “Under no circumstances will civilians be authorized to own any of the most dangerous firearms (e.g. a Kalashnikov), which is currently possible if they have been deactivated,” the proposal states.

3. Gun brokers and dealers will have to be licensed to deal in weapons. Collectors will have to get a license and face background checks even if they only own deactivated weapons. There will also be new limits on the ability to buy gun parts and ammunition online.

4. Tracing guns should become easier thanks to enhanced rules on how guns must be marked and registered. And blank firing weapons will be regulated for the first time because they can be converted to fire live ammunition.

If Lithuania’s parliament votes this in and the E.U. doesn’t interfere, Lithuania will become a safer place thanks to the presence of private firearms.

As demonstrated here in the U.S., the presence of more firearms in the hands of good people leads to fewer bad people committing crime with guns. If it works in the U.S., it can certainly work in Europe. Let’s hope the E.U. realizes it shouldn’t deprive individuals of their gun rights.