New York Times Endorses Thought Crimes

This is a really amazing editorial from the New York Times.

Kelvin Cochran, the Fire Chief of Atlanta, published a book (with permission from the Ethics Office for the City of Atlanta), in which he expressed his Christian faith on sex, marriage, and life. For that, the New York Times says he included “virulent anti-gay views.”

Actually, Cochran endorsed orthodox Christian views.

He was fired more than a year after the book came out. A retiring lesbian fire captain suddenly felt brave enough to complain. The Mayor, needed urban, white liberals for his next election threw the Fire Chief under the bus.

The New York Times is okay with that. According to the Times, “It should not matter that the investigation found no evidence that Mr. Cochran had mistreated gays or lesbians. His position as a high-level public servant makes his remarks especially problematic, and requires that he be held to a different standard.”

Yes. A leader is not allowed to take positions that might offend. Particularly, a leader cannot offend gays by having public Christian views.

It does not matter that there is no evidence of discrimination. His thoughts preclude him from his job.

New York Times Endorses Thought Crimes

This is a really amazing editorial from the New York Times.

Kelvin Cochran, the Fire Chief of Atlanta, published a book (with permission from the Ethics Office for the City of Atlanta), in which he expressed his Christian faith on sex, marriage, and life. For that, the New York Times says he included “virulent anti-gay views.”

Actually, Cochran endorsed orthodox Christian views.

He was fired more than a year after the book came out. A retiring lesbian fire captain suddenly felt brave enough to complain. The Mayor, needed urban, white liberals for his next election threw the Fire Chief under the bus.

The New York Times is okay with that. According to the Times, “It should not matter that the investigation found no evidence that Mr. Cochran had mistreated gays or lesbians. His position as a high-level public servant makes his remarks especially problematic, and requires that he be held to a different standard.”

Yes. A leader is not allowed to take positions that might offend. Particularly, a leader cannot offend gays by having public Christian views.

It does not matter that there is no evidence of discrimination. His thoughts preclude him from his job.

The post New York Times Endorses Thought Crimes appeared first on RedState.

Destruction Because of Offense: Je Suis Kelvin Cochran

It is a growing phenomenon, and it was on visible display last week. A group of terrorists was so offended by a publisher that the publisher had to be destroyed publicly as both an act of vengeance and an act of instruction.

The act of vengeance was directed against the publisher directly. He came under attack for his personal actions. He published something that offended the group. He published something that enraged them and, consequently, he needed to be punished.

The punishment could not be minor. It could not be something like heaping scorn on him. It could not be a public disagreement, a challenge or a debate. The subject, after all, is not debatable. The publisher had to be crushed, his livelihood taken, and he had to be ruined.

Ruining him, though, is not enough. There had to be instruction for others. The dictionary defines terrorism as “the use of violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims.” One of those political aims is to let others know that if they speak out, they will be ruined, too. The terrorist must teach the public that if any of them causes offense, they too will be taken out. It is more than that, though. It is also instruction to self-regulate against offense.

Once a person has been visibly ruined with no grace and no mercy because, in this example, he dared publish something that offended the terrorists, the lesson is clear. Polite society does not want that violence and cannot abide the violence. So the public will step in, as agents of the terrorist under duress, to shut up any others who might stand in the town square and risk offending. The public shuts them up and shuts them down because the public does not want the intimidation, harassment and ruin.

The result is that the conversation ceases. Importantly, it is not because the conversation was out of bounds culturally, civically or politically. It is only out of bounds because of the repercussions from a minority group intent on silencing dissent. Before the conversation stops in the town square, however, it stops in the offices, in the schools and in the academy. Eventually, it stops except between the best and most trusted of friends.

While much of the world focused on terrorists killing cartoonists in France for offending their religion, last week in Atlanta, Georgia, the mayor of Atlanta fired the city’s fire chief, Kelvin Cochran, for his Christian faith. The mayor claimed it was not Cochran’s faith, but Cochran’s judgment. The mayor’s excuse is hard to believe.

In November of 2013, Kelvin Cochran, a former Obama administration official turned chief of the fire department in Atlanta, Georgia, published a book titled “Who Told You That You Were Naked?” The book expounded on the fire chief’s faith and encouraged people to turn their lives over to Christ.

In the book, Cochran said his chief end was “to glorify God.” He said that was his first duty even in his job at the fire department. A reflection of the Westminster Catechism, it is also a summation of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Street Sweeper” speech. In that speech, Dr. King said that men needed to worship God and turn their lives over to God.

Dr. King began, “go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures; sweep streets like Handel and Beethoven composed music; sweep streets like Shakespeare wrote poetry; sweep streets so well that all the host of heaven and earth will have to pause and say, ‘Here lived a great street sweeper who swept his job well.’”

Kelvin Cochran, in his book, also said that any sex outside of heterosexual marriage is wrong. He said gay sex, like heterosexual sex outside of marriage, is a sin. For saying his job was to glorify God and gay sex is a sin, gay rights activists screamed loudly that he could not do his job. They accused Cochran, with no evidence, of proselytizing on the job.

The offended group of activists had to destroy Kelvin Cochran’s livelihood because his published work offended them. Mayor Reed of Atlanta complied.

The post Destruction Because of Offense: Je Suis Kelvin Cochran appeared first on RedState.

Destruction Because of Offense: Je Suis Kelvin Cochran

It is a growing phenomenon, and it was on visible display last week. A group of terrorists was so offended by a publisher that the publisher had to be destroyed publicly as both an act of vengeance and an act of instruction.

The act of vengeance was directed against the publisher directly. He came under attack for his personal actions. He published something that offended the group. He published something that enraged them and, consequently, he needed to be punished.

The punishment could not be minor. It could not be something like heaping scorn on him. It could not be a public disagreement, a challenge or a debate. The subject, after all, is not debatable. The publisher had to be crushed, his livelihood taken, and he had to be ruined.

Ruining him, though, is not enough. There had to be instruction for others. The dictionary defines terrorism as “the use of violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims.” One of those political aims is to let others know that if they speak out, they will be ruined, too. The terrorist must teach the public that if any of them causes offense, they too will be taken out. It is more than that, though. It is also instruction to self-regulate against offense.

Once a person has been visibly ruined with no grace and no mercy because, in this example, he dared publish something that offended the terrorists, the lesson is clear. Polite society does not want that violence and cannot abide the violence. So the public will step in, as agents of the terrorist under duress, to shut up any others who might stand in the town square and risk offending. The public shuts them up and shuts them down because the public does not want the intimidation, harassment and ruin.

The result is that the conversation ceases. Importantly, it is not because the conversation was out of bounds culturally, civically or politically. It is only out of bounds because of the repercussions from a minority group intent on silencing dissent. Before the conversation stops in the town square, however, it stops in the offices, in the schools and in the academy. Eventually, it stops except between the best and most trusted of friends.

While much of the world focused on terrorists killing cartoonists in France for offending their religion, last week in Atlanta, Georgia, the mayor of Atlanta fired the city’s fire chief, Kelvin Cochran, for his Christian faith. The mayor claimed it was not Cochran’s faith, but Cochran’s judgment. The mayor’s excuse is hard to believe.

In November of 2013, Kelvin Cochran, a former Obama administration official turned chief of the fire department in Atlanta, Georgia, published a book titled “Who Told You That You Were Naked?” The book expounded on the fire chief’s faith and encouraged people to turn their lives over to Christ.

In the book, Cochran said his chief end was “to glorify God.” He said that was his first duty even in his job at the fire department. A reflection of the Westminster Catechism, it is also a summation of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Street Sweeper” speech. In that speech, Dr. King said that men needed to worship God and turn their lives over to God.

Dr. King began, “go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures; sweep streets like Handel and Beethoven composed music; sweep streets like Shakespeare wrote poetry; sweep streets so well that all the host of heaven and earth will have to pause and say, ‘Here lived a great street sweeper who swept his job well.'”

Kelvin Cochran, in his book, also said that any sex outside of heterosexual marriage is wrong. He said gay sex, like heterosexual sex outside of marriage, is a sin. For saying his job was to glorify God and gay sex is a sin, gay rights activists screamed loudly that he could not do his job. They accused Cochran, with no evidence, of proselytizing on the job.

The offended group of activists had to destroy Kelvin Cochran’s livelihood because his published work offended them. Mayor Reed of Atlanta complied.

Atlanta’s Mayor Fires the City’s Fire Chief For Being a Christian

In 2013, more than a year ago, Atlanta’s Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran wrote a book called “Who Told You That You Were Naked?”

The book outlined his Christian faith. Chief Cochran is popular with Christians in Atlanta. Having previously left Atlanta to work for the Obama Administration, he came back as Fire Chief and wrote his book.

His book was published more than a year ago. In it, Chief Cochran encouraged young black men to find Jesus, be responsible, get married, and stop sleeping around. He wrote that all sex outside of marriage, from gay sex, to heterosexual sex, to even beastiality is an abomination.

The book was in print for a year and then the forces of Mordor found it. The Chief was suspended from his job and is now fired. Mayor Reed of Atlanta claims the Chief was fired for writing the book without permission and for speaking out while suspended. Never mind the book was written in 2013 and only in the last month has the Mayor taken action.

Mordor is complaining that Chief Cochran gave the book out to employees. The Chief says he only gave it to those who asked. Despite the spin on the Chief’s firing, we can get a strong sense of why exactly he was fired from an email blast that went out from Better Georgia a week ago.

Let’s be honest here — the likelihood that Better Georgia, a group Kasim Reed will want in his corner should he run for further office, sends out an email on December 29, 2014, and the Chief gets fired a week later, is just a coincidence is slim.

What was Better Georgia’s first complaint about Chief Cochran’s book? From their email:

Let’s take a closer look at what Cochran wrote with pages taken straight from his book. Keep in mind that he gave this book to his city employees.

Cochran says the top priority as fire chief for Atlanta is to “cultivate its culture for the glory of God.”

That is it. And for that, Chief Cochran is now unemployed.

You will be made to care.

The post Atlanta’s Mayor Fires the City’s Fire Chief For Being a Christian appeared first on RedState.

Atlanta’s Fire Chief Suspended For Publicly Professing Christian Beliefs

Even in Atlanta you will be made to care. Atlanta’s Fire Chief, Kelvin Cochran, has been suspended for one month for writing a book in which he maintains orthodox Christian beliefs on sex and marriage.

According to the Atlanta Business Chronicle,

Atlanta Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran is suspended for one month without pay after publishing a book that says homosexuality and having multiple sexual partners is “vile,” “vulgar”, and “inappropriate”.
The 162-page paperback titled “Who Told You That You Were Naked?” is being sold at Amazon.com.

The description of the book from Amazon is as follows:

This profound question, “Who told you that you were naked?, meant much more than, “Who told you that you do not have on clothes?” From God’s perspective nakedness meant so much more. It meant condemnation and deprivation to his most precious creation-mankind. Though He reconciled Adam’s condition by clothing him in coats of lambs’ skin, Adam never got over what he had done. Condemnation has dominated ever since. Now we have a more permanent solution. We have been clothed with Christ! Redeemed men who carry the curse of condemnation and deprivation cannot fulfill their purpose as husbands, fathers, community and business leaders-world changers! Adam never gave God a straight answer. It’s time to answer that question. WHO TOLD YOU THAT YOU WERE NAKED?

Chief Cochran is an evangelical Christian who has not shied away from his faith in the past. He left the Atlanta Fire Department to take a job in the Obama Administration. He returned, however, to the city he loves to head its Fire Department. But the gay mafia is loudly complaining that Chief Cochran, by writing this book, will suddenly now not put out the fires of gay homes, or something like that.

Specifically, the accusation is that by being honest about his orthodox Christian views on sex and marriage, Chief Cochran is undermining the public trust in him. You’d think the government would appreciate Kelvin Cochran being a role model to young black men in Atlanta, but they are instead much more focused on not offending the gay rights community.

What Mayor Reed and the gay rights community are saying is that if you work for government you cannot be open about your Christian faith. Again, you will be made to care.

If you like, you can order a copy of Chief Cochran’s book and maybe even send one to Mayor Kasim Reed. Mayor Reed’s address is:

Hon. Kasim Reed
55 Trinity Ave SW #2500
Atlanta, GA 30303